Can Pakistan Get its Messiah in its New Prime Minister Imran Khan?

Can Pakistan Get its Messiah in its New Prime Minister Imran Khan

Since its independence, Pakistan has witnessed many economic, social and political problems. In 2018, it would not be wrong to say that the country is going through one of its most – if not the most – turbulent phase. The nation has been denied aid by the U.S, and is staring at total bankruptcy. The recently held elections saw the party Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) come to power and its chairman Imran Ahmed Khan Niazi HI PP become its new Prime Minister. Many are curious to know whether he can be the messiah of the nation.

Economic issues

His first month as the PM has seen Imran tightening the expenditure, and taking steps to haul his country out of the financial mess. His government has sold 70 luxury cars, including BMW and Mercedes, of the PM House. It is likely to sell 102 luxury cars in total, and also additional helicopters. In the last 5 years, the total liabilities and debts of Pakistan rose to 29.9 trillion rupees, as revealed in a study by the State Bank of Pakistan.

Political issues

Imran has also pledged to offer citizenship to 1.5 million Afghan refugees and refugees from Bangladesh. He intends to do this to help refugees who have been sidelined for decades in the Pakistani society. However, analysts are questioning whether Khan has done this to reward the refugees who seem to have voted overwhelmingly for his party, PTI. A political incentive cannot be ruled out. His intention to provide them with ID cards and passport can have dangerous political consequences in the years to come.

Army culture

That the Pakistan Army calls the shots in the governance has long been a sad truth of the country. General V K Singh and author Shashi Tharoor of India believe that he has been propped up by the Pakistani army and similar thoughts exist in other neighboring nations as well as countries such as the U.S.

Terrorism

Terrorism happens to be a very big problem in Pakistan, and the fact that Imran supported Hafeez Saeedm, the 26/11 mastermind, was reason enough for Donald Trump’s Republican government to stop the release of $300 million aid to the country. Every foreign leader avoided Imran’s swearing-in ceremony as Prime Minister.

As P.M, Imran faces overwhelming challenges. But his friends, such as Indian cricketer Navjot Singh Sindhu who mention of having seen Imran converting his weaknesses into his strengths, are confident that he can lift Pakistan out of doldrums. Whether that happens or not, only time will tell.